National association to establish budtender guidelines

A new organization that seeks to establish regulatory standards for marijuana store ‘budtenders’ says there is an “urgent” need to ensure legalization doesn’t wipe out cannabis culture cliches.

The National Canadian Association for the Preservation of Cannabis Cliches, or NCAPCC, was established earlier this year by a group of concerned cannabis enthusiasts who say they feel legalization is changing the ‘cannabis culture’ too much. To combat this, the not-for-profit NGO is looking to establish a budtender course to ensure that employees at legal weed stores will understand the important parts of selling weed.

The course, to be announced in May of this year, will seek to get the ears of provincial and territorial cannabis boards across the country, who they hope will mandate all retailers are required to take the course.

“If legalization removes the nag champa and tie dye and specious correlation of medical effect and indica/sativa, then what’s the point of legalization?”

Dante Breamery, long time cannabis activist and cannabis retailer, and special advisor to the NCAPCC, says the group’s goal is to ensure that when Canadians walk into a legal cannabis store in the future they still experience everything that has made cannabis so great over the decades, from too much incense and rap or classic rock music played way too loud, to the nuances of indica and sativa and quality assurance like smoking a joint to make sure it doesn’t have any pesticides on it.

“People don’t understand this, but budtenders are the front line for customers in ensuring they get a high quality product,” says Breamery. “They know how to look at the bud to make sure it was grown organically or if it’s an indica or sativa. They understand that cannabis consumers prefer to have to scream their orders to make sure they are heard over a Wu Tang track played at top volume.”

“And more importantly,” continued Breamery, “they need to understand that cannabis culture is all about being a counter culture cliche. These new stores that look like apple stores, I bet they couldn’t even tell you that a Blue Skunk is better for a Saturday evening with a roast chicken dinner than a Green Kush, which is far better for a mid-sunday run down on the Sea Wall.”

Tina Toker, the President of NCAPCC, agrees.

“If legalization removes the nag champa and tie dye and specious correlation of medical effect and indica/sativa, then what’s the point of legalization?”

* This article has been approved by the Canadian Committee for Sustainable Satire (CCSS).

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